coldlikedeath (coldlikedeath) wrote in english_majors,
coldlikedeath
coldlikedeath
english_majors

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T -17 hours, MAN THE TORPEDOES, AHAHAHA, oh god.

Ladies, gentlemen, people who probably have PhDs and therefore know more than me, I come again.

Can someone please explain, in as simple language as is possible:

“This paltry age’s gaudy livery, I love it not.” and aestheticism. What is Oscar Wilde saying here, why? What is he rejecting? Royalty’s finery? (Couldn't be that. excuse the stupidness, my brain is fried with fear.) There was a feeling of tiredness, a need for change, but why? (I'm hoping that I'm asked to explain my feelings on the “there’s no such thing as an immoral book...” quote, that’s a fantastic one, and everyone knows the famous “wallpaper” quote, but that won’t appear.)

Here’s one I boggle at: “What is the meaning of ‘reflection’ and ‘shadow’ in Plato’s thought?  How does the mirror function in representing vanity and sin in medieval visual representations?” I just... WTF, what has Plato to do with this?

What movements are found under modernism and name names. What. I wasn't there for these classes but these questions may come up... hopefully my professor will be kind to me! (probably not but one can dream, eh?)

How do you understand Woolf’s principles of literary psychology in view of the statement “life is not a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged; life is a luminous halo, a semi transparent envelope surrounding us from the beginning of the consciousness to the end,” I would be tempted to say that all life is a stage when confronted with this one- and who said that, I don't remember. I have no idea what that quote even means never mind what she was referring to in it.

Has anyone read Orlando? I have no idea how it was different to Mrs Dalloway or To the Lighthouse... authorial goal? Someone kindly enlighten me?

I'm not sunk yet. Nearly there, though, there are questions on either Finnegan's Wake or Ulysses (both Joyce) and I've never read either, but I know what Ulysses is about.

ETA: this was for an exam. I have a retake. I don't see what Plato has to do with a thing here. I was asking for general, simple pointers, not asking for homework help... specific answers are needed here and I thought "well, perhaps this lot might be able to help a bit, someone's bound to know more than you". I think I was wrong about FW, I think it was actually Portrait, which I will read. 

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